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The Brus Book X

[Preparations for battle against John of Lorn]
Quhen Thomas Randell on this wis
Wes takyn as Ik her devys
And send to dwell in gud keping
For spek that he spak to the king,
The gud king that thocht on the scaith
The dispyt and felny bath
That Jhone off Lorne had till him doyn
His ost assemblyt he then sone
And towart Lorn he tuk the way
With his men intill gud aray.
Bot Jhone off Lorn off his cummyng
Lang or he come had wittering,
And men on ilk sid gadryt he
I trow twa thousand thai mycht be
And send thaim for to stop the way
Quhar the gud king behovyt away,
And that wes in an evill plas
That sa strayt and sa narow was
That twasum samyn mycht nocht rid
In sum place off the hillis sid.
The nethyr halff was peralous
For schor crag hey and hydwous
Raucht to the se doun fra the pas,
On athyr halff the montane was
Sua combrous hey and stay
That it was hard to pas that way.
I trow nocht that in all Bretane
Ane heyar hill may fundyn be.
Thar Jhone off Lorne gert his menye
Enbuschyt be abovyn the way,
For giff the king held thar away
He thocht he suld sone vencussyt be,
And himselff held him apon the se
Weill ner the pais with his galayis.
Bot the king that in all assayis
Wes fundyn wys and avisé
Persavyt rycht weill thar sutelte,
And that he neid that gait suld ga.
His men departyt he in twa
And till the gud lord off Douglas
Quham in herbryd all worschip was
He taucht the archerys everilkane
And this gud lord with him has tane
Schyr Alysander Fraser the wycht,
And Wylyam Wysman a gud knycht
And with thaim syne Schyr Androw Gray.
Thir with thar mengne held thar way
And clamb the hill deliverly
And or thai off the tother party
Persavyt thaim thai had ilkane
The hycht abovyne thar fayis tane.

[The battle beneath Ben Cruachan]

The king and his men held thar way,
And quhen intill the pas war thai
Entryt the folk of Lorne in hy
Apon the king raysyt the cry
And schot and tumblit on him stanys
Rycht gret and hevy for the nanys,
Bot thai scaith nocht gretly the king
For he had thar in his leding
Men that lycht and deliver war
And lycht armouris had on thaim thar
Sua that thai stoutly clamb the hill
And lettyt thar fayis to fulfill
The maist part of thar felny.
And als apon the tother party
Come James of Douglas and his rout
And schot apon thaim with a schout
And woundyt thaim with arowis fast,
And with thar swerdis at the last
Thai ruschyt amang thaim hardely,
For thai of Lorn full manlely
Gret and apert defens gan ma.
Bot quhen thai saw that thai war sua
Assaylit apon twa partys
And saw weill that thar ennemys
Had all the fayrer off the fycht
In full gret hy thai tuk the flycht,
And thai a felloun chas gan ma
And slew all that thai mycht ourta,
And thai that mycht eschap but delay
Rycht till ane water held thar way
That ran doun be the hillis syd.
It was sa styth and depe and wid
That men in na place mycht it pas
Bot at ane btyg that beneuth thaim was.
To that brig held thai straucht the way
And to brek it fast gan assay,
Bot thai that chassyt quhen thai thaim saw
Mak arest, but dred or aw
Thai ruschyt apon thaim hardely
And discumfyt thaim uterly,
And held the brig haile quhill the king
With all the folk off his leding
Passyt the brig all at thar ese.
To Jhone off Lorne it suld displese
I trow, quhen he his men mycht se
Oute off his schippis fra the se
Be slayne and chassyt in the hill,
That he mycht set na help thartill,
For it angrys als gretumly
To gud hartis that ar worthi
To se thar fayis fulfill thhar will
As to thaim selff to thoke the ill.

[The taking of Dunstaffnage and the surrender of Alexander of Argyll]

At sic myscheiff war thai of Lorn,
`For fele the lyvys thar has lorne
And other sum war fled thar way.
The king in hy gert sese the pray
Off all the land, quhar men mycht se
Sa gret habundance come of fe
That it war wonder to behauld.
The king that stout wes stark and bauld
Till Dunstaffynch rycht sturdely
A sege set and besily
Assaylit the castell it to get,
And in schort tym he has thaim set
In swilk thrang that tharin war than
That magre tharis he it wan,
And ane gud wardane tharin set
And betaucht hym bath men and met
Sua that he lang tyme thar mycht be
Magre thaim all off that countre.
Schyr Alerandir off Arghile that saw
The king dystroy up clene and law
His land send treyteris to the king
And cum his man but mar duelling,
And he resavit him till his pes,
Bot Jhone off Lorne his sone yeit wes
Rebell as he wes wont to be
And fled with schippis on the se,
Bot thai that left apon the land
War to the king all obeysand.
And he thar hostage all has tane
And towart Perth agayne is gane
To play him thar into the playne.

[The plan to take the peel of Linlithgow]

Yeit Lothyane was him agayne,
And at Lythkow wes than a pele
Mekill and stark and stuffyt wele
With Inglismen, and wes reset
To thaim that with armuris or met
Fra Edynburgh wald to Strevelyn ga
And fra Strevelyng agane alsua,
And till the countre did gret ill.
Now may ye her giff that ye will
Entrmellys and juperdyis
That men assayit mony wys
Castellis and peyllis for to ta,
And this Lithquhow wes ane off tha
And I sall tell You how it wes tane.
In the contre thar wonnyt ane
That husband wes, and with his fe
Oftsys hay to the peile led he,
Wilyame Bunnok to name he hicht
That stalwart man wes into ficht.
He saw sa hard the contre staid
That he gret noy and pite had
Throw the gret force that it was then
Governyt and led with Inglismen,
That travalyt men out-our mesure.
He wes a stout carle and a sture
And off himselff dour and hardy,
And had freyndis wonnand him by
And schawyt ti sum his prevete,
And apon his convyne gat he
Men that mycht ane enbuschement ma
Quhill that he with his wayne suld ga
To lede thaim hay into the pele
Bot his wayne suld be stuffyt wele,
For aucht men in the body
Off his wayn suld sit prevely
And with hay helyt be about,
And himselff that wes dour and stout
Suld be the wayne gang ydilly,
And ane yuman wycht and hardy
Befor suld dryve the wayne and ber
Ane hachat that war scharp to scher
Under his belt, and quhen the yat
War apynnyt and thai war tharat
And he hard him cry sturdely,
'Call all, call all,' than hastyly
He suld stryk with the ax in twa
the soyme, and than in hy suld tha
That war within the wayne cum out
And mak debate quhill that thar rout
That suld nerby enbushyt be
Cum for to manteyme the melle.

[The taking of the peel of Linlithgow]

This wes intill the hervyst tyd
Quhen feldis that ar fayr and wid
Chargyt with corne all fully war,
For syndry cornys that thai bar
Wox ryp to wyn to mannys fud,
And the treys all chargyt stud
With ser frutis on syndry wys.
In this swete tyme that I devys
Thai off the pele had wonnyn hay
And with this Bunnok spokyn had thai
To lede thar hay, for he wes ner,
And he assentyt but daunger
And said that he in the mornyng
Weile sone a fothyr he suld bring
Fayrer and gretar and weile mor
Than he brocht ony that yer befor,
And held thaim cunnand sekyrly.
For that nycht warnyt he prevely
Thaim that in the wayne suld ga
And that in the buschement suld be alsua,
And thai sa graithly sped thaim thar
That or day thai enbuschyt war
Weile ner the pele quhar thai mycht her
The cry als sone as ony wer,
And held thaim sua still but stering
That nane off thaim had persaving.
And this Bunnok fast gan him payne
To dres his menye in his wayne
And all a quhile befor the day
He had thaim helyt weile with ha
And maid him to yok his fe
Till men the son schynand mycht se,
And sum that war within the pele
War ischyt on thar awne unsele
To wyn thar hervyst ner tharby.
Than Bunnok with the cumpany
That in his wayne closyt he had
Went on his way but mar abaid
And callit his wayne towart the pele,
And the portar that saw him wele
Cum ner the yet, it opnyt sone,
And then Bunnok foroutyn hone
Gert



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