William Shakespeare Poems

  • 351.  
    Through the house give glimmering light
    By the dead and drowsy fire; Every elf and fairy sprite
  • 352.  
    So are you to my thoughts as food to life,
    Or as sweet-seasoned showers are to the ground; And for the peace of you I hold such strife
  • 353.  
    Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore,
    So do our minutes hasten to their end; Each changing place with that which goes before,
  • 354.  
    As fast as thou shalt wane, so fast thou grow'st
    In one of thine, from that which thou departest, And that fresh blood which youngly thou bestow'st,
  • 355.  
    But do thy worst to steal thyself away,
    For term of life thou art assured mine; And life no longer than thy love will stay,
  • 356.  
    As fast as thou shalt wane, so fast thou growest
    In one of thine, from that which thou departest; And that fresh blood which youngly thou bestowest
  • 357.  
    No, Time, thou shalt not boast that I do change:
    Thy pyramids built up with newer might To me are nothing novel, nothing strange;
  • 358.  
    Not from the stars do I my judgment pluck,
    And yet methinks I have astronomy; But not to tell of good or evil luck,
  • 359.  
    And let me the canakin clink, clink;
    And let me the canakin clink A soldier's a man;
  • 360.  
    YOU spotted snakes with double tongue,
       Thorny hedgehogs, be not seen; Newts and blind-worms, do no wrong;
  • 361.  
    Being your slave, what should I do but tend
    Upon the hours and times of your desire? I have no precious time at all to spend,
  • 362.  
    Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul
    Of the wide world dreaming on things to come, Can yet the lease of my true love control,
  • 363.  
    If the dull substance of my flesh were thought,
    Injurious distance should not stop my way; For then despite of space I would be brought,
  • 364.  
    Then let not winter's ragged hand deface
    In thee thy summer ere thou be distilled. Make sweet some vial; treasure thou some place
  • 365.  
    When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes,
    I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries
  • 366.  
    Music to hear, why hear'st thou music sadly?
    Sweets with sweets war not, joy delights in joy. Why lovest thou that which thou receivest not gladly,
  • 367.  
    MY love is strengthen'd, though more weak in seeming;
    I love not less, though less the show appear: That love is merchandised whose rich esteeming
  • 368.  
    Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all;
    What hast thou then more than thou hadst before? No love, my love, that thou mayst true love call;
  • 369.  
    I never saw that you did painting need
    And therefore to your fair no painting set; I found, or thought I found, you did exceed
  • 370.  
    When I consider every thing that grows
    Holds in perfection but a little moment. That this huge stage presenteth nought but shows
  • 371.  
    I grant thou wert not married to my Muse,
    And therefore mayst without attaint o'erlook The dedicated words which writers use
  • 372.  
    O me, what eyes hath Love put in my head,
    Which have no correspondence with true sight! Or, if they have, where is my judgment fled,
  • 373.  
    Full many a glorious morning have I seen
    Flatter the mountain-tops with sovereign eye, Kissing with golden face the meadows green,
  • 374.  
    When most I wink, then do mine eyes best see,
    For all the day they view things unrespected; But when I sleep, in dreams they look on thee,
  • 375.  
    How heavy do I journey on the way,
    When what I seek, my weary travel's end, Doth teach that case and that repose to say,
  • 376.  
    I never saw that you did painting need,
    And therefore to your fair no painting set; I found, or thought I found, you did exceed
  • 377.  
    From "A Midsummer-Night's Dream," Act V. Scene 2
    PUCK sings:
  • 378.  
    Sweet love, renew thy force! Be it not said
    Thy edge should blunter be than appetite, Which but today by feeding is allayed,
  • 379.  
    Was it the proud full sail of his great verse,
    Bound for the prize of all-too-precious you, That did my ripe thoughts in my brain inhearse,
  • 380.  
    But be contented when that fell arrest
    Without all bail shall carry me away; My life hath in this line some interest,
  • 381.  
    My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun;
    Coral is far more red than her lips' red; If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
  • 382.  
    Being your slave, what should I do but tend
    Upon the hours and times of your desire? I have no precious time at all to spend,
  • 383.  
    Those parts of thee that the world's eye doth view
    Want nothing that the thought of hearts can mend; All tongues, the voice of souls, give thee that due,
  • 384.  
    Not from the stars do I my judgment pluck;
    And yet methinks I have astronomy, But not to tell of good or evil luck,
  • 385.  
    O, that you were yourself! but, love, you are
    No longer yours than you yourself here live: Against this coming end you should prepare,
  • 386.  
    In loving thee thou know'st I am forsworn,
    But thou art twice forsworn to me love swearing: In act thy bed-vow broke and new faith torn
  • 387.  
    They that have power to hurt and will do none,
    That do not do the thing they most do show, Who, moving others, are themselves as stone,
  • 388.  
    Is it thy will thy image should keep open
    My heavy eyelids to the weary night? Dost thou desire my slumbers should be broken
  • 389.  
    Love is too young to know what conscience is;
    Yet who knows not conscience is born of love? Then, gentle cheater, urge not my amiss,
  • 390.  
    O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
    For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed? Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
  • 391.  
    Who is it that says most? which can say more
    Than this rich praise, that you alone are you? In whose confine immured is the store
  • 392.  
    Whilst I alone did call upon thy aid,
    My verse alone had all thy gentle grace, But now my gracious numbers are decayed,
  • 393.  
    But be contented: when that fell arrest
    Without all bail shall carry me away, My life hath in this line some interest,
  • 394.  
    Thou art as tyrannous, so as thou art,
    As those whose beauties proudly make them cruel; For well thou know'st to my dear doting heart
  • 395.  
    Let those who are in favour with their stars
    Of public honour and proud titles boast, Whilst I, whom fortune of such triumph bars,
  • 396.  
    Who is it that says most, which can say more,
    Than this rich praise -- that you alone are you, In whose confine immurèd is the store
  • 397.  
    Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea,
    But sad mortality o'ersways their power, How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea,
  • 398.  
    O, how much more doth beauty beauteous seem
    By that sweet ornament which truth doth give! The rose looks fair, but fairer we it deem
  • 399.  
    What is your substance, whereof are you made,
    That millions of strange shadows on you tend? Since everyone hath, every one, one shade,
  • 400.  
    How can my Muse want subject to invent
    While thou dost breathe, that pour'st into my verse Thine own sweet argument, too excellent
Total 513 poems written by William Shakespeare

Poem of the day

To-Night
 by Sara Teasdale

The moon is a curving flower of gold,
The sky is still and blue;
The moon was made for the sky to hold,
And I for you;
The moon is a flower without a stem,
The sky is luminous;
Eternity was made for them,
To-night for us.
...

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