TRUST POEMS

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If Only I Could, I Would

If only I could, I would

My mnd roaming with yr name on it
My mind taking a flashback on u,on us
.....

Maite Lemekwane
You Are Aware

You are aware of your world,
Detached from where other’s life curled.

You aren’t aware who will lie,
.....

Sakshi Seth
Ghazal 62

Well done O messenger, bring a message from my friend
Willingly I'll give my own life for the sake of my friend.
Like a nightingale in cage, being love-sick is my trend
A singing parrot in love with nuts and sweets of my friend.
.....

Shams Al-din Hafiz Shirazi
Norman And Saxon

My son," said the Norman Baron, "I am dying, and you will be heir
To all the broad acres in England that William gave me for my share
When we conquered the Saxon at Hastings, and a nice little handful it is.
But before you go over to rule it I want you to understand this:-
.....

Rudyard Kipling
On A Dead Child

Perfect little body, without fault or stain on thee,
With promise of strength and manhood full and fair!
Though cold and stark and bare,
The bloom and the charm of life doth awhile remain on thee.
.....

Robert Bridges
The Chemical Conviction

954

The Chemical conviction
That Nought be lost
.....

Emily Dickinson
The Song Of The Ungirt Runners

We swing ungirded hips,
And lightened are our eyes,
The rain is on our lips,
We do not run for prize.
.....

Charles Hamilton Sorley
Under Which Lyre

A REACTIONARY TRACT FOR THE TIMES

(Phi Beta Kappa Poem, Harvard, 1946)

.....

W. H. Auden
Any Wife To Any Husband

I

My love, this is the bitterest, that thou
Who art all truth and who dost love me now
.....

Robert Browning
A Hundred Collars

Lancaster bore him-such a little town,
Such a great man. It doesn't see him often
Of late years, though he keeps the old homestead
And sends the children down there with their mother
.....

Robert Frost
The Generations Of Men

A governor it was proclaimed this time,
When all who would come seeking in New Hampshire
Ancestral memories might come together.
And those of the name Stark gathered in Bow,
.....

Robert Frost
The Eve Of St. Agnes

St. Agnes' Eve-Ah, bitter chill it was!
The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold;
The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass,
And silent was the flock in woolly fold:
.....

John Keats
Sonnet 023: As An Unperfect Actor On The Stage

As an unperfect actor on the stage
Who with his fear is put beside his part,
Or some fierce thing replete with too much rage,
Whose strength's abundance weakens his own heart,
.....

William Shakespeare
Sonnet 048: How Careful Was I, When I Took My Way

How careful was I, when I took my way,
Each trifle under truest bars to thrust,
That to my use it might unusèd stay
From hands of falsehood, in sure wards of trust!
.....

William Shakespeare
Sonnet 122: Thy Gift, Thy Tables, Are Within My Brain

Thy gift, thy tables, are within my brain
Full charactered with lasting memory,
Which shall above that idle rank remain
Beyond all date even to eternity-
.....

William Shakespeare
Sonnet 129: Th’ Expense Of Spirit In A Waste Of Shame

Th' expense of spirit in a waste of shame
Is lust in action; and, till action, lust
Is perjured, murderous, bloody full of blame,
Savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust,
.....

William Shakespeare
Sonnet 138: When My Love Swears That She Is Made Of Truth

When my love swears that she is made of truth
I do believe her, though I know she lies,
That she might think me some untutored youth,
Unlearnèd in the world's false subtleties.
.....

William Shakespeare
France, The 18th Year Of These States

1

A great year and place;
A harsh, discordant, natal scream out-sounding, to touch the mother's heart
.....

Walt Whitman
Pensive On Her Dead Gazing, I Heard The Mother Of All

Pensive, on her dead gazing, I heard the Mother of All,
Desperate, on the torn bodies, on the forms covering the battle-fields gazing;
(As the last gun ceased-but the scent of the powder-smoke linger'd;)
As she call'd to her earth with mournful voice while she stalk'd:
.....

Walt Whitman
Song Of Myself

1
I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.
.....

Walt Whitman
Christabel

PART I

'Tis the middle of night by the castle clock
And the owls have awakened the crowing cock;
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Pains Of Sleep

Ere on my bed my limbs I lay,
It hath not been my use to pray
With moving lips or bended knees;
But silently, by slow degrees,
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
A Complaint

There is a change-and I am poor;
Your love hath been, nor long ago,
A fountain at my fond heart's door,
Whose only business was to flow;
.....

William Wordsworth
Character Of The Happy Warrior

Who is the happy Warrior? Who is he
That every man in arms should wish to be?
-It is the generous Spirit, who, when brought
Among the tasks of real life, hath wrought
.....

William Wordsworth
Lines Composed A Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, On Revisiting The Banks Of The Wye During A Tour. Ju

Five years have past; five summers, with the length
Of five long winters! and again I hear
These waters, rolling from their mountain-springs
With a soft inland murmur.-Once again
.....

William Wordsworth
Ode To Duty

Jam non consilio bonus, sed more eo perductus, ut non tantum
recte facere possim, sed nisi recte facere non possim
(Seneca, Letters 130.10)

.....

William Wordsworth
Ezra On The Strike

Wal, Thanksgivin' do be comin' round.
With the price of turkeys on the bound,
And coal, by gum! Thet were just found,
Is surely gettin' cheaper.
.....

Ezra Pound
The Cave Of The Unborn

I rose at night and visited
The Cave of the Unborn,
And crowding shapes surrounded me
For tidings of the life to be,
.....

Thomas Hardy
The Dance At The Phoenix

To Jenny came a gentle youth
From inland leazes lone;
His love was fresh as apple-blooth
By Parrett, Yeo, or Tone.
.....

Thomas Hardy
The Hunting Of The Snark

Dedication

Inscribed to a dear Child:
in memory of golden summer hours
.....

Lewis Carroll
If

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too:
.....

Rudyard Kipling
Recessional (a Victorian Ode)

God of our fathers, known of old-
Lord of our far-flung battle line-
Beneath whose awful hand we hold
Dominion over palm and pine-
.....

Rudyard Kipling
To A Contemporary Bunkshooter

You come along… tearing your shirt… yelling about Jesus.
Where do you get that stuff?
What do you know about Jesus?
Jesus had a way of talking soft and outside of a few
.....

Carl Sandburg
The Ballad Of Father O’hart

Good Father John O'Hart
In penal days rode out
To a Shoneen who had free lands
And his own snipe and trout.
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Ghost Of Roger Casement

O what has made that sudden noise?
What on the threshold stands?
It never crossed the sea because
John Bull and the sea are friends;
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Sea-change

Where river and ocean meet in a great tempestuous
frown,
Beyond the bar, where on the dunes the white-
capped rollers break;
.....

Ernest Dowson
Locksley Hall

Comrades, leave me here a little, while as yet ‘t is early morn:
Leave me here, and when you want me, sound upon the bugle-horn.

‘T is the place, and all around it, as of old, the curlews call,
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson
The Palace Of Art

I built my soul a lordly pleasure-house,
Wherein at ease for aye to dwell.
I said, “O Soul, make merry and carouse,
Dear soul, for all is well.”
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson
An Ode On The Popular Superstitions Of The Highlands Of Scotland, Considered As The Subject Of Poetr

Home, thou return'st from Thames, whose naiads long
Have seen thee ling'ring with a fond delay
'Mid those soft friends, whose hearts, some future day,
Shall melt, perhaps, to hear thy tragic song.
.....

William Collins
Absalom And Achitophel

In pious times, ere priest-craft did begin,
Before polygamy was made a sin;
When man, on many, multipli'd his kind,
Ere one to one was cursedly confin'd:
.....

John Dryden
Mac Flecknoe

All human things are subject to decay,
And, when Fate summons, monarchs must obey:
This Flecknoe found, who, like Augustus, young
Was call'd to empire, and had govern'd long:
.....

John Dryden
The Medal

Of all our antic sights and pageantry
Which English idiots run in crowds to see,
The Polish Medal bears the prize alone;
A monster, more the favourite of the town
.....

John Dryden
An Essay On Criticism

'Tis hard to say, if greater Want of Skill
Appear in Writing or in Judging ill,
But, of the two, less dang'rous is th' Offence,
To tire our Patience, than mis-lead our Sense:
.....

Alexander Pope
The Rape Of The Lock: Canto 2

Not with more glories, in th' etherial plain,
The sun first rises o'er the purpled main,
Than, issuing forth, the rival of his beams
Launch'd on the bosom of the silver Thames.
.....

Alexander Pope
The Rape Of The Lock: Canto 5

She said: the pitying audience melt in tears,
But Fate and Jove had stopp'd the Baron's ears.
In vain Thalestris with reproach assails,
For who can move when fair Belinda fails?
.....

Alexander Pope
A Little Bread—a Crust—a Crumb

159

A little bread-a crust-a crumb-
A little trust-a demijohn-
.....

Emily Dickinson
Afraid! Of Whom Am I Afraid?

608

Afraid! Of whom am I afraid?
Not Death-for who is He?
.....

Emily Dickinson
Could Live—did Live

43

Could live-did live-
Could die-did die-
.....

Emily Dickinson
Death Is A Dialogue Between

976

Death is a Dialogue between
The Spirit and the Dust.
.....

Emily Dickinson
Elizabeth Told Essex

1321

Elizabeth told Essex
That she could not forgive
.....

Emily Dickinson
He Strained My Faith

497

He strained my faith-
Did he find it supple?
.....

Emily Dickinson
Heavenly Father—take To Thee

1461

“Heavenly Father”-take to thee
The supreme iniquity
.....

Emily Dickinson
I Often Passed The Village

51

I often passed the village
When going home from school-
.....

Emily Dickinson
I Think Just How My Shape Will Rise

237

I think just how my shape will rise-
When I shall be “forgiven“-
.....

Emily Dickinson
Life—is What We Make Of It

698

Life-is what we make of it-
Death-we do not know-
.....

Emily Dickinson
Rearrange A “wife’s” Affection!

1737

Rearrange a “Wife's” affection!
When they dislocate my Brain!
.....

Emily Dickinson
Remember Me Implored The Thief!

1180

“Remember me” implored the Thief!
Oh Hospitality!
.....

Emily Dickinson
She Laid Her Docile Crescent Down

1396

She laid her docile Crescent down
And this confiding Stone
.....

Emily Dickinson
The Gentian Weaves Her Fringes

18

The Gentian weaves her fringes-
The Maple's loom is red-
.....

Emily Dickinson
They Leave Us With The Infinite

350

They leave us with the Infinite.
But He-is not a man-
.....

Emily Dickinson