SISTER POEMS

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How Many Times

How many times?

How many times does it get before it start to count?
He said it was needed just so she can fall in line
.....

Ademijuwon Adebagbo
My Insanity

i waited and watched

street wizard glass stone hip idealist
smoking their bed time flower
.....

Joseph Mayo Wristen
No To Xenophobia

Michael Johnson once said " I don't fancy colors of the face, I'm always attracted to colors of the brain"

I understand we all have our differences.
But while learning about history
.....

Mancoba Dludlu
The Congo

A Study of the Negro Race


I. Their Basic Savagery
.....

Vachel Lindsay
Jest ‘fore Christmas

Father calls me William, sister calls me Will,
Mother calls me Willie, but the fellers call me Bill!
Mighty glad I ain't a girl-ruther be a boy,
Without them sashes, curls, an' things that's worn by Fauntleroy!
.....

Eugene Field
Philomela

Hark! ah, the nightingale-
The tawny-throated!
Hark, from that moonlit cedar what a burst!
What triumph! hark!-what pain!
.....

Matthew Arnold
The Englishman In Italy

(PIANO DI SORRENTO.)

Fortu, Frotu, my beloved one,
Sit here by my side,
.....

Robert Browning
Out, Out—

The buzz-saw snarled and rattled in the yard
And made dust and dropped stove-length sticks of wood,
Sweet-scented stuff when the breeze drew across it.
And from there those that lifted eyes could count
.....

Robert Frost
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....

John Keats
Endymion: Book Ii

O Sovereign power of love! O grief! O balm!
All records, saving thine, come cool, and calm,
And shadowy, through the mist of passed years:
For others, good or bad, hatred and tears
.....

John Keats
Endymion: Book Iii

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
.....

John Keats
Endymion: Book Iv

Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
.....

John Keats
Hyperion: Book Iii

Thus in altemate uproar and sad peace,
Amazed were those Titans utterly.
O leave them, Muse! O leave them to their woes;
For thou art weak to sing such tumults dire:
.....

John Keats
On Fame

Fame, like a wayward girl, will still be coy
To those who woo her with too slavish knees,
But makes surrender to some thoughtless boy,
And dotes the more upon a heart at ease;
.....

John Keats
Adonais

I weep for Adonais-he is dead!
O, weep for Adonais! though our tears
Thaw not the frost which binds so dear a head!
And thou, sad Hour, selected from all years
.....

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Lines Written Among The Euganean Hills

Many a green isle needs must be
In the deep wide sea of Misery,
Or the mariner, worn and wan,
Never thus could voyage on-
.....

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Love’s Philosophy

The fountains mingle with the river
And the rivers with the ocean,
The winds of Heaven mix for ever
With a sweet emotion;
.....

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Ode To The West Wind

I

O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn's being,
Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead
.....

Percy Bysshe Shelley
The Invitation

Best and brightest, come away,
Fairer far than this fair day,
Which, like thee, to those in sorrow
Comes to bid a sweet good-morrow
.....

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Song Of Myself

1
I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.
.....

Walt Whitman
Frost At Midnight

The Frost performs its secret ministry,
Unhelped by any wind. The owlet's cry
Came loud, -and hark, again! loud as before.
The inmates of my cottage, all at rest,
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Nightingale

A Conversation Poem, April, 1798

No cloud, no relique of the sunken day
Distinguishes the West, no long thin slip
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Time, Real And Imaginary

An Allegory

On the wide level of a mountain's head,
(I knew not where, but 'twas some faery place)
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Lines Composed A Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, On Revisiting The Banks Of The Wye During A Tour. Ju

Five years have past; five summers, with the length
Of five long winters! and again I hear
These waters, rolling from their mountain-springs
With a soft inland murmur.-Once again
.....

William Wordsworth
Ash Wednesday

I

Because I do not hope to turn again
Because I do not hope
.....

T. S. Eliot
On The Portrait Of Two Beautiful Young People

A Brother and Sister

O I admire and sorrow! The heart's eye grieves
Discovering you, dark tramplers, tyrant years.
.....

Gerard Manley Hopkins
The Wreck Of The Deutschland

To the
happy memory of five Franciscan Nuns
exiles by the Falk Laws
drowned between midnight and morning of
.....

Gerard Manley Hopkins
Hiding

-to my sister

Because the moon in late October made landmarks glow: the broken
gate, our yard
.....

Kate Northrop
A Strange Wild Song

He thought he saw an Elephant
That practised on a fife:
He looked again, and found it was
A letter from his wife.
.....

Lewis Carroll
The Mad Gardener’s Song

He thought he saw an Elephant,
That practised on a fife:
He looked again, and found it was
A letter from his wife.
.....

Lewis Carroll
We And They

Father and Mother, and Me,
Sister and Auntie say
All the people like us are We,
And every one else is They.
.....

Rudyard Kipling
John Kinsella’s Lament For Mrs. Mary Moore

I

A bloody and a sudden end,
Gunshot or a noose,
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Municipal Gallery Revisited

I

Around me the images of thirty years:
An ambush; pilgrims at the water-side;
.....

William Butler Yeats
Break, Break, Break

Break, break, break,
On thy cold gray stones, O Sea!
And I would that my tongue could utter
The thoughts that arise in me.
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson
Ode To Simplicity

O thou, by Nature taught
To breathe her genuine thought
In numbers warmly pure, and sweetly strong;
Who first on mountains wild,
.....

William Collins
The Passions

An Ode for Music

When Music, heavenly maid, was young,
While yet in early Greece she sung,
.....

William Collins
To The Pious Memory Of The Accomplished Young Lady Mrs. Anne Killigrew

Thou youngest virgin-daughter of the skies,
Made in the last promotion of the Blest;
Whose palms, new pluck'd from Paradise,
In spreading branches more sublimely rise,
.....

John Dryden
An Essay On Criticism

'Tis hard to say, if greater Want of Skill
Appear in Writing or in Judging ill,
But, of the two, less dang'rous is th' Offence,
To tire our Patience, than mis-lead our Sense:
.....

Alexander Pope
Eloisa To Abelard

In these deep solitudes and awful cells,
Where heav'nly-pensive contemplation dwells,
And ever-musing melancholy reigns;
What means this tumult in a vestal's veins?
.....

Alexander Pope
The Dying Christian To His Soul

Vital spark of heav'nly flame,
Quit, oh, quit, this mortal frame!
Trembling, hoping, ling'ring, flying,
Oh, the pain, the bliss of dying!
.....

Alexander Pope
The Rape Of The Lock: Canto 4

But anxious cares the pensive nymph oppress'd,
And secret passions labour'd in her breast.
Not youthful kings in battle seiz'd alive,
Not scornful virgins who their charms survive,
.....

Alexander Pope
Brother Of Ingots—ah Peru—

1366

Brother of Ingots-Ah Peru-
Empty the Hearts that purchased you-
.....

Emily Dickinson
One Sister Have I In Our House

14

One Sister have I in our house,
And one, a hedge away.
.....

Emily Dickinson
The Gentian Weaves Her Fringes

18

The Gentian weaves her fringes-
The Maple's loom is red-
.....

Emily Dickinson
Unto Like Story—trouble Has Enticed Me

295

Unto like Story-Trouble has enticed me-
How Kinsmen fell-
.....

Emily Dickinson
Wonder—is Not Precisely Knowing

1331

Wonder-is not precisely Knowing
And not precisely Knowing not-
.....

Emily Dickinson
Bed Sitter

He stared at me with sad, hurt eyes,
That drab, untidy man;
And though my clients I despise
I do the best I can
.....

Robert Service
Dark Trinity

Said I to Pain: “You would not dare
Do ill to me.”
Said Pain: “Poor fool! Why should I care
Whom you may be?
.....

Robert Service
Fleurette

(The Wounded Canadian Speaks)

My leg? It's off at the knee.
Do I miss it? Well, some. You see
.....

Robert Service
Hot Digitty Dog

Hot digitty dog! Now, ain't it queer,
I've been abroad for over a year;
Seen a helluva lot since then,
Killed, I reckon, a dozen men;
.....

Robert Service
Madam La Maquise

Said Hongray de la Glaciere unto his proud Papa:
“I want to take a wife mon Père,” The Marquis laughed: “Ha! Ha!
And whose, my son?” he slyly said; but Hongray with a frown
Cried, “Fi! Papa, I mean-to wed, I want to settle down.”
.....

Robert Service
My Twins

Of twin daughters I'm the mother-
Lord! how I was proud of them;
Each the image of the other,
Like two lilies on one stem;
.....

Robert Service
The Ballad Of The Leather Medal

Only a Leather Medal, hanging there on the wall,
Dingy and frayed and faded, dusty and worn and old;
Yet of my humble treasures I value it most of all,
And I wouldn't part with that medal if you gave me its weight in gold.
.....

Robert Service
The Ballad Of The Northern Lights

One of the Down and Out-that's me. Stare at me well, ay, stare!
Stare and shrink-say! you wouldn't think that I was a millionaire.
Look at my face, it's crimped and gouged-one of them death-mask things;
Don't seem the sort of man, do I, as might be the pal of kings?
.....

Robert Service
The Law Of The Yukon

This is the law of the Yukon, and ever she makes it plain:
“Send not your foolish and feeble; send me your strong and your sane-
Strong for the red rage of battle; sane for I harry them sore;
Send me men girt for the combat, men who are grit to the core;
.....

Robert Service
Village Don Juan

Lord, I'm grey, my face is run,
But by old Harry, I've had my fun;
And all about, I seem to see
Lads and lassies that look like me;
.....

Robert Service
Easter Zunday

Last Easter Jim put on his blue
Frock cwoat, the vu'st time-vier new;
Wi' yollow buttons all o' brass,
That glitter'd in the zun lik' glass;
.....

William Barnes
The Castle Ruins

A happy day at Whitsuntide,
As soon 's the zun begun to vall,
We all stroll'd up the steep hill-zide
To Meldon, gret an' small;
.....

William Barnes
The Young That Died In Beauty

If souls should only sheen so bright
In heaven as in e'thly light,
An' nothen better wer the cease,
How comely still, in sheape an' feace,
.....

William Barnes
Vull A Man

No, I'm a man, I'm vull a man,
You beat my manhood, if you can.
You'll be a man if you can teake
All steates that household life do meake.
.....

William Barnes