FREEDOM POEMS

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Our Nation Is Ill

OUR NATION IS ILL
Doom Days Drum
Blood and war on the hill
The centre is shattered
.....

Ola Olawale
Red Signal

Red is the color of love
But; 4 me red
Is a color of stop
My red signal;my periods
.....

Amina Hanfa
The Battle Cry Of Freedom (southern Version)

Our flag is proudly floating
On the land and on the main,
Shout, shout the battle cry of Freedom!
Beneath it oft we've conquered,
.....

Anonymous Americas
Wishes For My Son, Born On Saint Cecilia’s Day, 1912

Now, my son, is life for you,
And I wish you joy of it,-
Joy of power in all you do,
Deeper passion, better wit
.....

Thomas Macdonagh
The Secret People

Smile at us, pay us, pass us; but do not quite forget.
For we are the people of England, that never have spoken yet.
There is many a fat farmer that drinks less cheerfully,
There is many a free French peasant who is richer and sadder than we.
.....

G. K. Chesterton
Marie Antoinette

They told to Marie Antoinette:
“The beggers at your gate
Have eyes too sad for tears to wet,
And for your pity wait.”
.....

Robert Service
The Two Ages

On a great cathedral window I have seen
A Summer sunset swoon and sink away,
Lost in the splendours of immortal art.
Angels and saints and all the heavenly hosts,
.....

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
My Insanity

i waited and watched

street wizard glass stone hip idealist
smoking their bed time flower
.....

Joseph Mayo Wristen
Unchained

The bird ain't as free as she thinks
Freedom is not just in the air
The prisoner is not enslaved as he thinks
Slavery is not just in a cell
.....

Apollos Alpha
Sonnet 12

XII. On the same.

I did but prompt the age to quit their cloggs
By the known rules of antient libertie,
.....

John Milton
The Giaour: A Fragment Of A Turkish Tale

No breath of air to break the wave
That rolls below the Athenian's grave,
That tomb which, gleaming o'er the cliff
First greets the homeward-veering skiff
.....

George Gordon Byron
To A Fallen Elm

Old Elm that murmured in our chimney top
The sweetest anthem autumn ever made
And into mellow whispering calms would drop
When showers fell on thy many coloured shade
.....

John Clare
How Sleep The Brave

How sleep the brave, who sink to rest
By all their country's wishes blest!
When Spring, with dewy fingers cold,
Returns to deck their hallow'd mould,
.....

William Collins
The Colored Soldiers

If the muse were mine to tempt it
And my feeble voice were strong,
If my tongue were trained to measures,
I would sing a stirring song.
.....

Paul Laurence Dunbar
A Wish

I ask not that my bed of death
From bands of greedy heirs be free;
For these besiege the latest breath
Of fortune's favoured sons, not me.
.....

Matthew Arnold
In Memory Of W.b. Yeats

I

He disappeared in the dead of winter:
The brooks were frozen, the airports almost deserted,
.....

W. H. Auden
Like A Vocation

Not as that dream Napoleon, rumour's dread and centre,
Before who's riding all the crowds divide,
Who dedicates a column and withdraws,
Nor as that general favourite and breezy visitor
.....

W. H. Auden
Old People’s Home

All are limitory, but each has her own
nuance of damage. The elite can dress and decent themselves,
are ambulant with a single stick, adroit
to read a book all through, or play the slow movements of
.....

W. H. Auden
The Italian In England

That second time they hunted me
From hill to plain, from shore to sea,
And Austria, hounding far and wide
Her blood-hounds through the countryside,
.....

Robert Browning
The Progress Of Poesy

Awake, Æolian lyre, awake,
And give to rapture all thy trembling strings.
From Helicon's harmonious springs
A thousand rills their mazy progress take:
.....

Thomas Gray
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....

John Keats
Endymion: Book Ii

O Sovereign power of love! O grief! O balm!
All records, saving thine, come cool, and calm,
And shadowy, through the mist of passed years:
For others, good or bad, hatred and tears
.....

John Keats
Endymion: Book Iii

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
.....

John Keats
To Hope

When by my solitary hearth I sit,
And hateful thoughts enwrap my soul in gloom;
When no fair dreams before my “mind's eye” flit,
And the bare heath of life presents no bloom;
.....

John Keats
Sonnet 046: Mine Eye And Heart Are At A Mortal War

Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war
How to divide the conquest of thy sight;
Mine eye my heart thy picture's sight would bar,
My heart mine eye the freedom of that right,
.....

William Shakespeare
Venus And Adonis

Even as the sun with purple-coloured face
Had ta'en his last leave of the weeping morn,
Rose-cheeked Adonis hied him to the chase;
Hunting he loved, but love he laughed to scorn.
.....

William Shakespeare
Lines Written Among The Euganean Hills

Many a green isle needs must be
In the deep wide sea of Misery,
Or the mariner, worn and wan,
Never thus could voyage on-
.....

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Europe, The 72d And 73d Years Of These States

1

Suddenly, out of its stale and drowsy lair, the lair of slaves,
Like lightning it le'pt forth, half startled at itself,
.....

Walt Whitman
Song Of Myself

1
I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.
.....

Walt Whitman
Fears In Solitude

Written in April 1798, during the alarm of an invasion

A green and silent spot, amid the hills,
A small and silent dell! O'er stiller place
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
France: An Ode

I

Ye clouds! that far above me float and pause,
Whose pathless march no mortal may control!
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Reflections On Having Left A Place Of Retirement

Sermoni propriora.-Hor.

Low was our pretty Cot; our tallest Rose
Peep'd at the chamber-window. We could hear
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
A Poet!—he Hath Put His Heart To School

A poet!-He hath put his heart to school,
Nor dares to move unpropped upon the staff
Which art hath lodged within his hand-must laugh
By precept only, and shed tears by rule.
.....

William Wordsworth
It Is Not To Be Thought Of

It is not to be thought of that the Flood
Of British freedom, which, to the open sea
Of the world's praise, from dark antiquity
Hath flowed, “with pomp of waters, unwithstood,”
.....

William Wordsworth
London, 1802

Milton! thou should'st be living at this hour:
England hath need of thee: she is a fen
Of stagnant waters: altar, sword, and pen,
Fireside, the heroic wealth of hall and bower,
.....

William Wordsworth
Ode: Intimations Of Immortality From Recollections Of Early Childhood

The child is father of the man;
And I could wish my days to be
Bound each to each by natural piety.
(Wordsworth, “My Heart Leaps Up”)
.....

William Wordsworth
Ode To Duty

Jam non consilio bonus, sed more eo perductus, ut non tantum
recte facere possim, sed nisi recte facere non possim
(Seneca, Letters 130.10)

.....

William Wordsworth
The Power Of Armies Is A Visible Thing

The power of Armies is a visible thing,
Formal and circumscribed in time and space;
But who the limits of that power shall trace
Which a brave People into light can bring
.....

William Wordsworth
To A Highland Girl

(At Inversneyde, upon Loch Lomond)

Sweet Highland Girl, a very shower
Of beauty is thy earthly dower!
.....

William Wordsworth
Four Quartets 1: Burnt Norton

I

Time present and time past
Are both perhaps present in time future,
.....

T. S. Eliot
Four Quartets 3: The Dry Salvages

(The Dry Salvages-presumably les trois sauvages
- is a small group of rocks, with a beacon, off the N.E.
coast of Cape Ann, Massachusetts. Salvages is pronounced
to rhyme with assuages. Groaner: a whistling buoy.)
.....

T. S. Eliot
Four Quartets 4: Little Gidding

I

Midwinter spring is its own season
Sempiternal though sodden towards sundown,
.....

T. S. Eliot
The Greek National Anthem

We knew thee of old,
Oh divinely restored,
By the light of thine eyes
And the light of thy Sword.
.....

Rudyard Kipling
To The Unknown Goddess

Will you conquer my heart with your beauty; my sould going out from afar?
Shall I fall to your hand as a victim of crafty and cautions shikar?

Have I met you and passed you already, unknowing, unthinking and blind?
.....

Rudyard Kipling
Demon And Beast

For certain minutes at the least
That crafty demon and that loud beast
That plague me day and night
Ran out of my sight;
.....

William Butler Yeats
Parnell

Parnell came down the road, he said to a cheering man:
‘Ireland shall get her freedom and you still break stone.'


.....

William Butler Yeats
A Last Word

Let us go hence: the night is now at hand;
The day is overworn, the birds all flown;
And we have reaped the crops the gods have sown;
Despair and death; deep darkness o'er the land,
.....

Ernest Dowson
Locksley Hall Sixty Years After

Late, my grandson! half the morning have I paced these sandy tracts,
Watch'd again the hollow ridges roaring into cataracts,

Wander'd back to living boyhood while I heard the curlews call,
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson
Of Old Sat Freedom On The Heights

Of old sat Freedom on the heights,
The thunders breaking at her feet:
Above her shook the starry lights:
She heard the torrents meet.
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson
Ode To Liberty

STROPHE

Who shall awake the Spartan fife,
And call in solemn sounds to life
.....

William Collins
Ode To Simplicity

O thou, by Nature taught
To breathe her genuine thought
In numbers warmly pure, and sweetly strong;
Who first on mountains wild,
.....

William Collins
Ode Written In The Beginning Of The Year 1746

How sleep the brave, who sink to rest,
By all their country's wishes blest!
When Spring, with dewy fingers cold,
Returns to deck their hallowed mould,
.....

William Collins
The Medal

Of all our antic sights and pageantry
Which English idiots run in crowds to see,
The Polish Medal bears the prize alone;
A monster, more the favourite of the town
.....

John Dryden
An Essay On Criticism

'Tis hard to say, if greater Want of Skill
Appear in Writing or in Judging ill,
But, of the two, less dang'rous is th' Offence,
To tire our Patience, than mis-lead our Sense:
.....

Alexander Pope
Now I Knew I Lost Her—

1219

Now I knew I lost her-
Not that she was gone-
.....

Emily Dickinson
At The Golden Pig

Where once with lads I scoffed my beer
The landlord's lass I've wed.
Now I am lord and master here;-
Thank God! the old man's dead.
.....

Robert Service
Captivity

O meadow lark, so wild and free,
It cannot be, it cannot be,
That men to merchandise your spell
Do close you in a wicker hell!
.....

Robert Service
Enemy Conscript

What are we fighting for,
We fellows who go to war?
fighting for Freedom's sake!
(You give me the belly-ache.)
.....

Robert Service
Freedom’s Fool

To hell with Government I say;
I'm sick of all the piddling pack.
I'd like to scram, get clean away,
And never, nevermore come back.
.....

Robert Service
Men Of The High North

Men of the High North, the wild sky is blazing;
Islands of opal float on silver seas;
Swift splendors kindle, barbaric, amazing;
Pale ports of amber, golden argosies.
.....

Robert Service