BROTHER POEMS

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The Corn-stalk Fiddle

When the corn 's all cut and the bright stalks shine
Like the burnished spears of a field of gold;
When the field-mice rich on the nubbins dine,
And the frost comes white and the wind blows cold;
.....

Paul Laurence Dunbar
A Servant To Servants

I didn't make you know how glad I was
To have you come and camp here on our land.
I promised myself to get down some day
And see the way you lived, but I don't know!
.....

Robert Frost
The Two Ages

On a great cathedral window I have seen
A Summer sunset swoon and sink away,
Lost in the splendours of immortal art.
Angels and saints and all the heavenly hosts,
.....

Ella Wheeler Wilcox
No To Xenophobia

Michael Johnson once said " I don't fancy colors of the face, I'm always attracted to colors of the brain"

I understand we all have our differences.
But while learning about history
.....

Mancoba Dludlu
The Old Familiar Faces

I have had playmates, I have had companions,
In my days of childhood, in my joyful school-days-
All, all are gone, the old familiar faces.

.....

Charles Lamb
The Congo

A Study of the Negro Race


I. Their Basic Savagery
.....

Vachel Lindsay
My Dog

'Twas in a pub just off the Strand
When I was in my cups,
There passed a bloke with in his hand
Two tiny puling pups;
.....

Robert Service
Jest ‘fore Christmas

Father calls me William, sister calls me Will,
Mother calls me Willie, but the fellers call me Bill!
Mighty glad I ain't a girl-ruther be a boy,
Without them sashes, curls, an' things that's worn by Fauntleroy!
.....

Eugene Field
A Wish

I ask not that my bed of death
From bands of greedy heirs be free;
For these besiege the latest breath
Of fortune's favoured sons, not me.
.....

Matthew Arnold
The Englishman In Italy

(PIANO DI SORRENTO.)

Fortu, Frotu, my beloved one,
Sit here by my side,
.....

Robert Browning
Snow

The three stood listening to a fresh access
Of wind that caught against the house a moment,
Gulped snow, and then blew free again-the Coles
Dressed, but dishevelled from some hours of sleep,
.....

Robert Frost
The Death Of The Hired Man

Mary sat musing on the lamp-flame at the table
Waiting for Warren. When she heard his step,
She ran on tip-toe down the darkened passage
To meet him in the doorway with the news
.....

Robert Frost
Endymion: Book I

ENDYMION.

A Poetic Romance.

.....

John Keats
Endymion: Book Iii

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
.....

John Keats
Endymion: Book Iv

Muse of my native land! loftiest Muse!
O first-born on the mountains! by the hues
Of heaven on the spiritual air begot:
Long didst thou sit alone in northern grot,
.....

John Keats
Epistle To My Brother George

Full many a dreary hour have I past,
My brain bewildered, and my mind o'ercast
With heaviness; in seasons when I've thought
No spherey strains by me could e'er be caught
.....

John Keats
Hyperion: Book Ii

Just at the self-same beat of Time's wide wings
Hyperion slid into the rustled air,
And Saturn gain'd with Thea that sad place
Where Cybele and the bruised Titans mourn'd.
.....

John Keats
To My Brother George

Many the wonders I this day have seen:
The sun, when first he kissed away the tears
That filled the eyes of Morn;-the laurelled peers
Who from the feathery gold of evening lean;-
.....

John Keats
An Exhortation

Chameleons feed on light and air:
Poets' food is love and fame:
If in this wide world of care
Poets could but find the same
.....

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Love’s Philosophy

The fountains mingle with the river
And the rivers with the ocean,
The winds of Heaven mix for ever
With a sweet emotion;
.....

Percy Bysshe Shelley
To Night

Swiftly walk over the western wave,
Spirit of Night!
Out of the misty eastern cave
Where, all the long and lone daylight,
.....

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Out Of The Cradle Endlessly Rocking

1

Out of the cradle endlessly rocking,
Out of the mocking-bird's throat, the musical shuttle,
.....

Walt Whitman
Pioneers! O Pioneers!

1

Come, my tan-faced children,
Follow well in order, get your weapons ready;
.....

Walt Whitman
Song Of Myself

1
I celebrate myself, and sing myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.
.....

Walt Whitman
Christabel

PART I

'Tis the middle of night by the castle clock
And the owls have awakened the crowing cock;
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Fears In Solitude

Written in April 1798, during the alarm of an invasion

A green and silent spot, amid the hills,
A small and silent dell! O'er stiller place
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Reflections On Having Left A Place Of Retirement

Sermoni propriora.-Hor.

Low was our pretty Cot; our tallest Rose
Peep'd at the chamber-window. We could hear
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Dungeon

And this place our forefathers made for man!
This is the process of our love and wisdom,
To each poor brother who offends against us-
Most innocent, perhaps-and what if guilty?
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner

Part I

It is an ancient Mariner,
And he stoppeth one of three.
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Time, Real And Imaginary

An Allegory

On the wide level of a mountain's head,
(I knew not where, but 'twas some faery place)
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
To The Rev. George Coleridge

Notus in fratres animi paterni.
Hor. Carm. lib.II.2.

A blesséd lot hath he, who having passed
.....

Samuel Taylor Coleridge
The Price

Knee deep in the Watauga's
rock leaping whitewater,
my brother loses his balance,
his life if our father
.....

Ron Rash
Extempore Effusion Upon The Death Of James Hogg

When first, descending from the moorlands,
I saw the Stream of Yarrow glide
Along a bare and open valley,
The Ettrick Shepherd was my guide.
.....

William Wordsworth
Michael: A Pastoral Poem

If from the public way you turn your steps
Up the tumultuous brook of Green-head Ghyll,
You will suppose that with an upright path
Your feet must struggle; in such bold ascent
.....

William Wordsworth
The Green Linnet

Beneath these fruit-tree boughs that shed
Their snow-white blossoms on my head,
With brightest sunshine round me spread
Of spring's unclouded weather,
.....

William Wordsworth
To A Highland Girl

(At Inversneyde, upon Loch Lomond)

Sweet Highland Girl, a very shower
Of beauty is thy earthly dower!
.....

William Wordsworth
Yarrow Revisited

The gallant Youth, who may have gained,
Or seeks, a “winsome Marrow,”
Was but an Infant in the lap
When first I looked on Yarrow;
.....

William Wordsworth
The Waste Land

‘Nam Sibyllam quidem Cumis ego ipse oculis meis
vidi in ampulla pendere, et cum illi pueri dicerent:
Sibylla ti theleis; respondebat illa: apothanein thelo.'

.....

T. S. Eliot
Brothers

How lovely the elder brother's
Life all laced in the other's,
Lóve-laced!-what once I well
Witnessed; so fortune fell.
.....

Gerard Manley Hopkins
On The Portrait Of Two Beautiful Young People

A Brother and Sister

O I admire and sorrow! The heart's eye grieves
Discovering you, dark tramplers, tyrant years.
.....

Gerard Manley Hopkins
The Wreck Of The Deutschland

To the
happy memory of five Franciscan Nuns
exiles by the Falk Laws
drowned between midnight and morning of
.....

Gerard Manley Hopkins
Thee, God, I Come From, To Thee Go

Thee, God, I come from, to thee go,
All day long I like fountain flow
From thy hand out, swayed about
Mote-like in thy mighty glow.
.....

Gerard Manley Hopkins
The Walrus And The Carpenter

Tweedledee said to Alice, “You like poetry-”

“Ye-es, pretty well-some poetry,” Alice said doubtfully.

.....

Lewis Carroll
Mental Cases

Who are these? Why sit they here in twilight?
Wherefore rock they, purgatorial shadows,
Drooping tongues from jaws that slob their relish,
Baring teeth that leer like skulls' tongues wicked?
.....

Wilfred Owen
Wild With All Regrets

(Another version of “A Terre”.)

To Siegfried Sassoon

.....

Wilfred Owen
Mowgli’s Song

THAT HE SANG AT THE COUNCIL ROCK WHEN HE DANCED ON SHERE KHAN'S HIDE

The Song of Mowgli-I, Mowgli, am singing. Let
the jungle listen to the things I have done.
.....

Rudyard Kipling
The Prodigal Son

Here come I to my own again,
Fed, forgiven and known again,
Claimed by bone of my bone again
And cheered by flesh of my flesh.
.....

Rudyard Kipling
Iron

Guns,
Long, steel guns,
Pointed from the war ships
In the name of the war god.
.....

Carl Sandburg
Kin

Brother, I am fire
Surging under the ocean floor.
I shall never meet you, brother-
Not for years, anyhow;
.....

Carl Sandburg
From The ‘antigone’

Overcome-O bitter sweetness,
Inhabitant of the soft cheek of a girl-
The rich man and his affairs,
The fat flocks and the fields' fatness,
.....

William Butler Yeats
Roadside Crosses

This is a state where nothing marks the spot
officially. They crop up now and then
out on the Freeway, or in rustic plots
sometimes, near S-curves in the country, when
.....

Jared Carter
Running To Paradise

As I came over Windy Gap
They threw a halfpenny into my cap.
For I am running to paradise;
And all that I need do is to wish
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Fiddler Of Dooney

When I play on my fiddle in Dooney.
Folk dance like a wave of the sea;
My cousin is priest in Kilvarnet,
My brother in Mocharabuiee.
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Two Kings

King Eochaid came at sundown to a wood
Westward of Tara. Hurrying to his queen
He had outridden his war-wasted men
That with empounded cattle trod the mire,
.....

William Butler Yeats
The Wanderings Of Oisin: Book I

S. Patrick. You who are bent, and bald, and blind,
With a heavy heart and a wandering mind,
Have known three centuries, poets sing,
Of dalliance with a demon thing.
.....

William Butler Yeats
To Ireland In The Coming Times

Know, that I would accounted be
True brother of a company
That sang, to sweeten Ireland's wrong,
Ballad and story, rann and song;
.....

William Butler Yeats
To One In Bedlam

With delicate, mad hands, behind his sordid bars,
Surely he hath his posies, which they tear and twine;
Those scentless wisps of straw, that miserably line
His strait, caged universe, whereat the dull world stares,
.....

Ernest Dowson
Demeter And Persephone

Faint as a climate-changing bird that flies
All night across the darkness, and at dawn
Falls on the threshold of her native land,
And can no more, thou camest, O my child,
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson
Locksley Hall Sixty Years After

Late, my grandson! half the morning have I paced these sandy tracts,
Watch'd again the hollow ridges roaring into cataracts,

Wander'd back to living boyhood while I heard the curlews call,
.....

Alfred Lord Tennyson